November 8, 2012

Hari Ragat: Tropical Weather Table

Thanks to Brendan Strejcek’s post on his blog (see bottom of post), I’ve gotten an idea for random weather determination in Hari Ragat.

IMG_6986

Weather changes may be determined daily or three days, with adjustments for the current season.  Effects are considered mainly from the point of view of a traveller.  Roll on the table below with 1d6 plus modifiers, if any.

   

Sea Travel

Overland Travel

6

Fine Steady winds, sunny with good visibility, warm conditions; do not roll for weather changes again until after 3 days

Very good travel conditions, warm to hot; do not roll for weather changes again  until after 3 days

 

5

Fair

Steady winds, sunny but with some cloud, warm to hot conditions; roll for weather changes again next day

 

Good travel conditions, warm to hot; roll for weather changes again next day

4

Threatening

Roll 1d3: 1 – Becalmed, 2-3 roll for weather change again with –1 modifier at noon; warm to hot conditions

 

Roll for weather change again with –1 modifier at noon; hot to very hot conditions, and muggy

3

Light Rains

Sea travel unaffected; roll for weather change again at –1 next day; warm to cool conditions

 

Trails start to get muddy; roll for weather change again at  -1 next day; warm to cool conditions

2

Heavy Rains

Sea travel dangerous; roll for weather change at +1 next day and add 1 day to sailing time; cool to cold conditions

 

Trails very muddy, swampy and other flood-prone terrains impassable; roll for weather change at +1 next day; cool to cold conditions

1

Stormy

Sea travel near impossible; cold; roll for weather change at –2 next day; roll 1d3 – 1d3 and add the result to the sailing time*

 

Land travel near impossible; cold; widespread flooding; roll for weather change at –2 next day

As you can see from this table, weather tends to cycle.  Good weather tends to hold for several days, while light rains tend to lead to rainier weather ahead, but heavy rains increase the chance of fairer weather after.

*Note that storms may actually speed up your travel, if you luck out with winds that blow in your desired direction!

Initial rolls are made at the following seasonal modifiers:

Height of the Habagat monsoon

-2

Beginning/end of the Habagat monsoon

-1

Height of the Amihan monsoon

+2

Beginning/end of the Amihan monsoon

+0

Do not use the seasonal modifier again after the first roll, only the modifiers provided by the results table. Consider the first roll for weather made as happening on the 2nd day of any journey, as of course any traveller would set off only on a pretty favorable day; consider each leg of a journey as a new cycle of rolls.

Example
Dimasalang decides to make a voyage to visit some distant kinfolk on another island, hoping to recruit some of them into his following.  Circumstances however delay him, so he’s able to make the voyage only at the start of the Habagat monsoon.  The voyage is expected to last 5 days.

On his second day of voyaging (we assume he’d set sail on at least a Fair day!), he rolls 3 –1 = 2; Heavy Rain! Dimasalang must pit his seamanship against some rough water.

We have to do a weather change roll for Dimasalang the day after, but with a +1; 5 + 1 = 6!  The next dawn is Fine, and he’s granted 3 days of it! Dimasalang reaches his relatives’ island within this window of Fair weather.

When he sets off on the return voyage, we make a new roll with the seasonal modifier again for the 2nd day: 1, a Stormy day!  What hath Dimasalang done to offend the gods?! We roll 3 – 2 = +1, however, so the storm does  benefit our hero after all, shortening the voyage home by a day.

On the second day, we roll 6 –2 = 4; the storm has passed, but the skies remain Threatening, and we have to roll again at noon. It’s another 1!  The storm roars up again, and behold, Dimasalang gets his trip shortened by +2 days! If he can survive this storm, he’ll actually be surfing home on its surge tomorrow …

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